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ITV's The Web Review gives EI site "10/10"!

Jason Bradbury
16 December 2002

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UK channel ITV’s World Wide Web review series, The Web Review, reviewed the Electronic Intifada and gave it a rating of 10/10, describing our site as “compelling [and] intelligent”, and concluding that EI is “a democratic bombshell, a fascinating look between and behind the lines.” The presenters asserted, “this collection of news clippings, video and audio streams presents some intelligent and forceful arguments about how information from the Palestinian side of the divide is filtered.”

Panel: Is criticism of Israel anti-Semitism?

Ali Abunimah,
Peter Novick,
Arnold Wolf and
Emily Hauser
16 December 2002

On 3 December 2002, EI’s Ali Abunimah, historian Peter Novick, writer Emily Hauser and Rabbi Arnold Wolf met at the University of Chicago to consider the differences between criticism of Israel and anti-Semitism. EI presents the text of the opening remarks of the four panelists.

Bernard Lewis: In the service of empire

Lamis Andoni
16 December 2002

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Bernard Lewis

Veteran analyst Lamis Andoni examines the views of Bernard Lewis, the man who coined the phrase “clash of civilisations” and inspiration for much of the current US administration’s Middle East policy, in this article based on her UC Berkeley course, “The War on Terrorism: The US, Islam and the Arab World”.

Foreign films get a snub

Rob Salem and
Phinjo Gombu
16 December 2002

A decision that works from three countries are not eligible to enter the competition for the Oscars prompts an outcry over Academy rules. The Toronto Star, citing EI, follows up on the story.

Rafah: Israeli forces demolish 16 homes and 8 greenhouses

Palestinian Center for Human Rights
15 December 2002

On Sunday evening, December 15, Israeli occupying forces demolished 16 houses and destroyed 8 greenhouses in the ‘Oraiba area in Rafah. The demolition of those homes has rendered approximately 120 people, including dozens of women and children, homeless in this cold weather.

Weekly report on human rights violations

Palestinian Center for Human Rights
15 December 2002

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Israeli occupying forces have perpetrated more war crimes and human rights violations against Palestinian civilians, including willful and extra-judicial killings, shelling of, and incursion into Palestinian areas as well as agricultural land leveling. This week, 20 Palestinians, mostly civilians, including 3 women and 2 children, were killed by Israeli forces.

EI letter about Palestine's Oscars' exclusion in <I>The Toronto Star</I>

Ali Abunimah and
Benjamin J Doherty
14 December 2002

In a letter in EI’s Ali Abunimah and Benjamin Doherty expose the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences excuse for keeping Palestine out of the Oscars as nonsense. The Academy said that entering countries must be members of the United Nations. But, the record shows that the Oscars accept entries from regions not recognized by the UN all the time.

False Washington Times report convinces Canada to ban Hizbullah

Nigel Parry
13 December 2002

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On Wednesday 11th December 2002, the social arm of Lebanese resistance group Hizbullah was one of three organisations to be added to Canada’s official list of “terrorist entities”. Canadian newspapers and politicians cited, as the ultimate deciding factor for Canada’s policy change towards Hizbullah, a statement attributed to its leader Hassan Nasrallah last month in which he allegedly urged Palestinians to undertake suicide bombings outside of Israel/Palestine, in locations around the world. But it has now emerged that the source of the remarks is suspect, meaning that an organisation widely recognised for its humanitarian contributions in desperate areas of the Middle East has been cut off from a considerable number of donors on the basis of a false account. EI’s Nigel Parry reports.

NPR allows dubious, sensational claims to stand

Ali Abunimah
13 December 2002

NPR loudly reported highly dubious, anonymous claims that Palestinian “extremists” linked to Al-Qaida had obtained a deadly nerve agent from Iraq. When Pentagon sources poured cold water on the charges, which came from a Washington Post journalist who had previously concealed news at the government’s request, NPR fell silent. EI’s Ali Abunimah takes NPR to task.

NPR confuses irresponsible speculation for hard news

Ali Abunimah
12 December 2002

NPR demonstrated a complete lack of skepticism about a report in the Washington Post citing shadowy and anonymous government sources claiming that Lebanon-based Al-Qaida-lined extremists obtained a deadly chemical weapon from Iraq. By failing to ask any hard questions, NPR served essentially as a transcription service for the government, rather than as an independent source of news and analysis. EI’s Ali Abunimah explains.

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