Builder of apartheid wall gets EU funding

The construction of Israel’s wall in the occupied West Bank has caused massive ecological damage. 

Wisam Hashlamoun APA images

I have been following Europe’s policy on Palestine for almost 20 years. Throughout that time, I cannot recall an official EU statement more obscene than the one issued after Israel killed nine people in Gaza last Friday.

Rather than condemn the killings, the EU merely claimed that they raise “serious questions about the proportionate use of force.”

Zoom in on those words: proportionate use of force.

The underlying message is that Israel may resort to violence against Palestinians living under siege and occupation. EU representatives would just prefer it if Israel doesn’t go too far.

The same kind of thinking can be discerned within Israel’s elite.

During the first month of the second intifada – which began in late September 2000 – Israeli troops fired an estimated one million bullets in the occupied West Bank and Gaza. Amos Malka, then head of intelligence in the Israeli military, is among those who have expressed misgivings about that massive display of force.

Malka’s misgivings related to tactics, rather than ethics. In a paper he subsequently wrote on his experiences with the military, Malka argued that Israel should be willing to use extreme violence on occasions. The paper reflects the standard Israeli view that acts of Palestinian resistance may be labeled collectively as “terrorism.”

“The terrorist or guerrilla organization must take into consideration that Israel can ‘go crazy’ and lash out far beyond its standard responses,” he wrote.

Since retiring from the army in 2002, Malka has taken a number of posts with Israel’s war industry.

For example, he chairs the board of TAT Technologies, a firm making air conditioning systems and other equipment for military aircraft and tanks. As the firm’s clients include the Israeli air force and leading weapons manufacturers from Israel and the US, there is a near certainty that its products have enabled attacks on Palestinians.

Always eager to help Israel’s arms industry, the EU is subsidizing TAT Technologies. The firm is taking part in an EU-funded research project on aircraft engines worth $3.5 million.

Tacky

Brochures published by TAT Technologies say that it offers “cool solutions for hot problems.” That slogan is similarly tacky to the name of the aforementioned research project: DEVILS.

The clumsy marketing does not conceal how the EU is happy to take taxpayers’ money and hand it to corporate scoundrels.

Another beneficiary of EU grants is Nesher, Israel’s leading cement maker.

Nesher is deeply involved in building the infrastructure of Israel’s occupation. Its materials have been used for Israel’s settlement activities in the West Bank, including the light rail network in East Jerusalem.

About 15 years ago, Amnesty International stated that Nesher had probably supplied material, too, for Israel’s apartheid wall. The wall, which snakes through the West Bank, was ruled illegal by the International Court of Justice in 2004.

The Amnesty finding was based on an admission by Nesher’s then parent company, the Dublin-based CRH, that cement supplied by Nesher was “in all probability” being used to build the wall. Following a lengthy campaign by Palestine solidarity activists, CRH announced in 2016 that it had pulled out of the Israeli market.

Nesher’s role in the occupation has been well-documented. That makes it all the more inexcusable for the EU to approve the firm’s participation in a research project worth $8.5 million on the reuse of carbon dioxide.

The project in question is being presented as a contribution to the fight against climate change. Yet the idea that Nesher could be regarded as environmentally benign is simply farcical.

The construction of Israel’s apartheid wall has destroyed vast areas of land and thousands of trees. Located beside a vitally important groundwater basin, its construction advances Israeli efforts to steal natural resources from Palestinians.

Environmental damage can’t be magicked away. Wrapping a fake green ribbon around its activities doesn’t alter how the EU is embracing Israel’s war profiteers.

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The EU, like the United Nations, the American Congress, the British Parliament, et al are all made up, invariably, of cowards. Making money and the fear of being called, yet again, an anti-Semite (a term and smear so meaningless, like the boy who continually cried "Wolf!" it is trifling) brings a chill down these coward's yellow spines.
No cold-blooded murder, no torture, no brutality, no crime against humanity committed by Israel would be enough to condemn those Zionist monsters.
In addition, the lives of Palestinians (Muslim, Christian, or Druze) Sudanese, Ethiopians, and other non-white Jews who reside in that Illegitimate country don't count for anything.
Making money and the cheapness of non-Jewish lives in Israel accounts for much of what is done by the above mentioned cowards.
Thankfully, the tide is slowly turning against Israel and Zionism worldwide. The profoundness of this fact is that this sea change is occurring at the grass roots level in nearly every country on the planet. Even in the "Occupation of the American Mind" United States these changes can be read and spoken about openly, particularly on university and college campuses all across the nation. Time is on the side of the Palestinians, Sudanese, Ethiopians, and so forth and not on the side of Illegitimate Israel!

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David Cronin

David Cronin's picture

David Cronin is an associate editor of The Electronic Intifada. His latest book is Balfour’s Shadow: A Century of British Support for Zionism and Israel (Pluto, 2017).